Dr. Miller talks about the risks and side effects of PBSC donation


Dr. Miller Talks About The Risks And Side Effects Of PBSC Donation

Common side effects of PBSC donation may include:
• Bruising at the needle site
• Numbness or tingling
• Chills
• And a Decrease in blood platelet count

Dr. Miller Talks About The Risks And Side Effects Of PBSC Donation

Dr. Miller Talks About The Risks And Side Effects Of PBSC Donation

Some donors experience tingling around the mouth, fingers and toes and mild muscle cramps. This is caused by the anti-coagulant (blood thinner) used in the apheresis procedure. These symptoms are treated with calcium replacement (oral of IV) or by slowing down the procedure. The symptoms will subside shortly after the donation.

Dr. Miller Talks About The Risks And Side Effects Of PBSC Donation

Platelet loss may cause blood to take longer than normal to clot so donors who experience platelet loss might bruise more easily.

Dr. Miller Talks About The Risks And Side Effects Of PBSC Donation

Donors can continue to take non-aspirin products (e.g. acetaminophen or ibuprofen) such as Tylenol®, Motrin® or Advil® as needed, but they should not take aspirin because it could prolong bleeding.

Dr. Miller Talks About The Risks And Side Effects Of PBSC Donation

Less common side effects of PBSC donation include:
• Lightheadedness and
• Nausea

Dr. Miller Talks About The Risks And Side Effects Of PBSC Donation

Rare side effects and risks of PBSC donation include:
• Fainting due to lowered blood pressure
• Infection and
• Nerve injury

Dr. Miller Talks About The Risks And Side Effects Of PBSC Donation

Dr. Miller talks about the risks and side effects of PBSC donation

Common side effects of PBSC donation may include:
• Bruising at the needle site
• Numbness or tingling
• Chills
• And a Decrease in blood platelet count

Some donors experience tingling around the mouth, fingers and toes and mild muscle cramps. This is caused by the anti-coagulant (blood thinner) used in the apheresis procedure. These symptoms are treated with calcium replacement (oral of IV) or by slowing down the procedure. The symptoms will subside shortly after the donation.

Platelet loss may cause blood to take longer than normal to clot so donors who experience platelet loss might bruise more easily.

Donors can continue to take non-aspirin products (e.g. acetaminophen or ibuprofen) such as Tylenol®, Motrin® or Advil® as needed, but they should not take aspirin because it could prolong bleeding.

Less common side effects of PBSC donation include:
• Lightheadedness and
• Nausea

Rare side effects and risks of PBSC donation include:
• Fainting due to lowered blood pressure
• Infection and
• Nerve injury