Blood discovery: JAM-A protein keeps blood clots in check


Blood Discovery: JAM-A Protein Keeps Blood Clots In Check

Read more: At left, the JAM-A protein at work in reducing a blood clot; at right, a blood clot grows unchecked in the absence of the JAM-A protein. The images were taken with an intravital microscope.

Blood Discovery: JAM-A Protein Keeps Blood Clots In Check

Blood Discovery: JAM-A Protein Keeps Blood Clots In Check

A research team in the University of Delaware Department of Biological Sciences examines this particular protein in blood called junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A), found on the surface of platelets.

Blood Discovery: JAM-A Protein Keeps Blood Clots In Check

Although a number of different proteins in blood have been shown to slow clot formation, JAM-A is a far more powerful clot inhibitor, Ulhas Naik, director of the Delaware Cardiovascular Research Center at the University of Delaware, and his research team have discovered.

Blood Discovery: JAM-A Protein Keeps Blood Clots In Check

Naik notes JAM-A could potentially be a biomarker doctors could use to determine if a patient is at higher risk for a heart attack or stroke.

Blood Discovery: JAM-A Protein Keeps Blood Clots In Check

Their findings were recently reported in Blood, the flagship journal of the American Society of Hematology.

Blood Discovery: JAM-A Protein Keeps Blood Clots In Check

Blood Discovery: JAM-A Protein Keeps Blood Clots In Check

Blood discovery: JAM-A protein keeps blood clots in check

Read more: http://tinyurl.com/87g6pkk At left, the JAM-A protein at work in reducing a blood clot; at right, a blood clot grows unchecked in the absence of the JAM-A protein. The images were taken with an intravital microscope.

A research team in the University of Delaware Department of Biological Sciences examines this particular protein in blood called junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A), found on the surface of platelets.

Although a number of different proteins in blood have been shown to slow clot formation, JAM-A is a far more powerful clot inhibitor, Ulhas Naik, director of the Delaware Cardiovascular Research Center at the University of Delaware, and his research team have discovered.

Naik notes JAM-A could potentially be a biomarker doctors could use to determine if a patient is at higher risk for a heart attack or stroke.

Their findings were recently reported in Blood, the flagship journal of the American Society of Hematology.