Angina pectoris


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What is angina pectoris? Angina pectoris is chest pain that's felt due to lack of blood flow to the heart muscle. Angina's most often caused by atherosclerosis, but may also be due to heart muscle growth. This video covers the pathophysiology of angina, as well as differentiates the three types: stable angina, unstable angina, and vasoplastic angina.

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This video is brought to you by Osmosis. Along with providing open-access videos, Osmosis offers a comprehensive e-learning platform that connects med students with thousands of flashcards and quiz questions, depending on each student's needs. Ever wish information would just diffuse into your brain? Well, Osmosis helps make that possible—don't learn it, osmose it!

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This video is licensed under a Creative Commons CC-BY-SA 4.0 international license, which means that you're free to share and adapt it so long as you follow the Attribution and ShareAlike terms and conditions!

Resources:

Credits:
Script/audio/visuals: Tanner Marshall, MS
Reviewer: Rishi Desai, MD, MPH

Attributions:
Clean paper rip sound effect by Mike Koenig –

Our supporters:
Wade Licup

Angina pectoris

What is angina pectoris? Angina pectoris is chest pain that's felt due to lack of blood flow to the heart muscle. Angina's most often caused by atherosclerosis, but may also be due to heart muscle growth. This video covers the pathophysiology of angina, as well as differentiates the three types: stable angina, unstable angina, and vasoplastic angina.

Subscribe - http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNI0qOojpkhsUtaQ4_2NUhQ?sub_confirmation=1

This video is brought to you by Osmosis. Along with providing open-access videos, Osmosis offers a comprehensive e-learning platform that connects med students with thousands of flashcards and quiz questions, depending on each student's needs. Ever wish information would just diffuse into your brain? Well, Osmosis helps make that possible—don't learn it, osmose it!

https://www.osmosis.org/

Support us on Patreon! - https://goo.gl/izRx2z

We also have free practice questions for the USMLE and NCLEX-RN exams here: https://goo.gl/3oGOEi

Also, we're social:

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/OsmoseIt/
Twitter - https://twitter.com/osmoseit


Got feedback? We'd love to hear it!

http://goo.gl/forms/T6de48NVzR


This video is licensed under a Creative Commons CC-BY-SA 4.0 international license, which means that you're free to share and adapt it so long as you follow the Attribution and ShareAlike terms and conditions!

Resources:
http://www.hindawi.com/journals/isrn/2013/671503/
http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/HeartAttack/SymptomsDiagnosisofHeartAttack/Unstable-Angina_UCM_437513_Article.jsp#.VuDK9JMrJTY
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prinzmetal%27s_angina

Credits:
Script/audio/visuals: Tanner Marshall, MS
Reviewer: Rishi Desai, MD, MPH

Attributions:
Clean paper rip sound effect by Mike Koenig - http://soundbible.com/1930-Clean-Paper-Rip.html

Our supporters:
Wade Licup